Temperatures leap 40 degrees above normal as the Arctic Ocean and Greenland ice sheet see record June melting

And it may be messing with our weather.

Ice is melting in unprecedented ways as summer approaches in the Arctic. In recent days, observations have revealed a record-challenging melt event over the Greenland ice sheet, while the extent of ice over the Arctic Ocean has never been this low in mid-June during the age of weather satellites.

Greenland saw temperatures soar up to 40 degrees above normal Wednesday, while open water exists in places north of Alaska where it seldom, if ever, has in recent times.

It’s “another series of extreme events consistent with the long-term trend of a warming, changing Arctic,” said Zachary Labe, a climate researcher at the University of California at Irvine.

And the abnormal warmth and melting of ice in the Arctic may be messing with our weather.

Data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center show that the Greenland ice sheet appears to have witnessed its biggest melt event so early in the season on record this week (although a few other years showed similar mid-June melting).

Read more: Washington Post

By |2019-06-24T17:37:53+01:00June 26th, 2019|Energy and Climate Change, News|
This website uses cookies and third party services. Ts & Cs Ok

Privacy Policy

You can view our Privacy Policy here.

Term of Use

You can view our Terms of Use here.